Hacking Human Behavior: “Tiny Habits” Start, Maintain Changes

BJ Fogg directs the Behavior Design Lab at Stanford University, leads Persuasion Boot Camps and wrote Persuasive Technology: Using Computers to Change What We Think and Do

BJ Fogg

He defines behavior change targets according to :

Type of change:
• Initiate new behavior
• Maintain existing behavior
• Increase  behavior
• Decrease behavior
• Stop behavior

Frequency of change:
• Dot – One time behavior
• Span – Time-limited behavior
• Path – Continuing behavior

From this matrix, he identifies 15 ways to change behavior, and recommends designing behavior change as a “span” for time-limited behavior, like the Alcoholic Anonymous “One Day at a Time” credo.

He evaluates behavior for ease vs. difficulty and motivation as high vs. low, and designs behaviors for ease and to capture moments of high motivation, to align with his assertion that “Behavior occurs in response to trigger at the same time as motivation + ability.”

Fogg notes that motivation is experienced in “waves”, and recommends seizing moments of high motivation to do “difficult” behaviors, and to capitalize on low motivation to do routine activities.

To enable the co-occurrence of motivation and ability, Fogg links behavior change to a reminder (also known as a “prompt”, “cue”, “call-to-action” or “trigger”) to “exceed the activation threshold.”

He suggests designing behavior change to existing behaviors according to the formula: “After xxx, I will yyyy”, such as “After I walk in the door, I will hang my keys on the hook.”

Fogg recommends reinforcing behavior change by celebrating successful behavior execution, and cited examples of people who tell themselves “I’m awesome”  or actually pat themselves on the back.

-*What practices have been most effective for you in maintaining new behaviors?

Linkedin Open Group: Executive Coach
Twitter: @kathrynwelds
Google+
Facebook Notes:
Blog: – Kathryn Welds | Curated Research and Commentary

©Kathryn Welds

Advertisements

13 thoughts on “Hacking Human Behavior: “Tiny Habits” Start, Maintain Changes

  1. Pingback: “Nudging” Compassion, Resilience to Reduce Conflict, Stress | Kathryn Welds | Curated Research and Commentary

  2. Pingback: Interpersonal Envy in Competitive Organizations and the “Search Inside Yourself” (SIY) Antidote | Kathryn Welds | Curated Research and Commentary

  3. Pingback: How to Change Habits: Jamming the “Flywheel of Society” | Kathryn Welds | Curated Research and Commentary

  4. Pingback: Memorable Business Stories: Ideas and Numbers | Kathryn Welds | Curated Research and Commentary

  5. Pingback: Glass Elevator and Nine Principles for Personal Branding, Career Impact | Kathryn Welds | Curated Research and Commentary

  6. Pingback: Evidence-Based Stress Management – Vitamins, Probiotics – Part 1 of 5 | Kathryn Welds | Curated Research and Commentary

  7. Pingback: Evidence-Based Stress Management – Mindful Attention – Part 2 of 5 | Kathryn Welds | Curated Research and Commentary

  8. Pingback: Evidence-Based Stress Management – Social Support – Part 3 of 5 | Kathryn Welds | Curated Research and Commentary

  9. Pingback: Evidence-Based Stress Management – Music – Part 4 of 5 | Kathryn Welds | Curated Research and Commentary

  10. Pingback: Evidence-Based Stress Management – Physical Exercise – Part 5 of 5 | Kathryn Welds | Curated Research and Commentary

  11. Pingback: Still Fulfilling Your New Year’s Resolutions? | Kathryn Welds | Curated Research and Commentary

  12. Pingback: Multiple Paths Toward Goals Can Motivate, then Derail Success | Kathryn Welds | Curated Research and Commentary

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s