Tag Archives: gender equity

Male Peer Raters Discount Women’s Expertise in Science, Engineering

J Stuart Bunderson

J Stuart Bunderson

Problem-solving work groups and individual career development benefit from accurate recognition and deployment of expertise.

Nancy DiTomaso

Nancy DiTomaso

People who are perceived as experts by team members, regardless of their actual expertise, have a number of career advantages, found Washington University’s J. Stuart Bunderson:

  • Greater influence in group decision-making,
  • More opportunities to perform,
  • Great opportunity for team leadership roles.
D Randall Smith

D Randall Smith

In addition, peer evaluations of expertise frequently contribute to individual rewards, compensation, and advancement, noted Rutgers’ Nancy DiTomaso, D. Randall Smith and George F. Farris with Corinne Post of Pace University and New Jersey Institute of Technology ‘s Rene Cordero.

Melissa Thomas-Hunt

Melissa Thomas-Hunt

Teams benefit when they accurately identify and use group members’ expertise because they perform more effectively and produce higher quality work products, found Cornell’s Melissa C. Thomas-Hunt, Tonya Y. Ogden of Washington University, and Stanford’s Margaret A. Neale.

Aparna Joshi

Aparna Joshi

However, women in science and engineering do not have equal opportunities to fully use their expertise in work groups, and to receive commensurate rewards, reported Penn State’s Aparna Joshi.

George Farris

George Farris

She obtained peer ratings and longitudinal research productivity data for 500 scientists and engineers and found that women’s technical expertise was undervalued by male colleagues in peer ratings.

Rene Cordero

Rene Cordero

Male and female raters assigned different importance to education when evaluating team members’ expertise.
Women’s ratings were correlated with the target person’s education level, but males evaluators considered educational attainment less than male gender in assigning highest ratings for expertise.

As a result, women’s highest ratings went to those with the highest education level, whereas men’s top evaluations were assigned to other men, no matter their education level.

Margaret Neale

Margaret Neale

Women received significantly lower expertise evaluations than men, and men evaluated highly educated women more negatively than female raters who assessed their peers.

These findings suggest that male peers discount women’s educational achievements and are unlikely to effectively use women’s expertise, to the detriment of team work output as well as individual recognition.

-*How do you ensure that your expertise is recognized and applied in work groups?

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Saudi Women’s Driving Campaign meets “When Everything Changed”

Saudi Women Driving CampaignSaudi Women’s Driving Campaign occurred near the time that New York Times columnist Gail Collins discussed her book When Everything Changed: The Amazing Journey of American Women from 1960 to the Present  at Harvard’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Studies.
Though separated by oceans and time zones, both events refer to the continuing challenge of women achieving parity in societies and workplaces.

Sheikh Saleh bin Saad al-Luhaidan

Sheikh Saleh bin Saad al-Luhaidan

Although there is no law mandating that women do not drive cars in Saudi Arabia, it is actively discouraged by religious leaders like Sheikh Saleh bin Saad al-Luhaydan, who asserted that driving injures women’s pelvis and ovaries and causes birth defects in children of women.

Saudi Woman DrivingSaudi Police detained women who drove cars on 26 October 2013, Saudi Women’s Driving Day, until their “guardians” arrived.
At that time, women were instructed to sign an affidavit stating that they would not drive a car in the future.

Jennifer Psaki

Jennifer Psaki

U.S. State Department spokesperson Jennifer Psaki said, “We support the full inclusion of women in Saudi society…. we would support their ability to drive.  We support, of course, the right of women everywhere to make their own decisions about their lives and their futures and the right to benefit equally from public services and protection from discrimination.”

Hisham Fageeh

Hisham Fageeh

Hisham Fageeh provided the memorable commentary on the controversy with his homage to Bob MarleyNo Woman, No Drive, a viral sensation.

Gail Collins

Gail Collins

According to Collins, “everything changed” for women in the U.S. in the 1960s, although many might say that many issues toward equity remain unresolved.
So far, everything has not changed for Saudi women, but they may find encouragement and even humor in Collins’ chronicle of women’s experience toward parity in the U.S.

-*What actions enable full social equity for Saudi women?

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