Listening to Music Increases Endurance, Reduce Perceived Discomfort in Physical Exercise

Costas Karageorghis

Costas Karageorghis

Listening to up-tempo music synchronized to low- or moderate-intensity exercise can distract from fatigue and discomfort and reduce oxygen consumption, according to Sheffield Hallam University’s CJ Bacon and TR Myers, and Brunel University’s Costas Karageorghis.

They found that cyclists who listened to synchronous up-tempo music used 7% less oxygen than those who cycled in silence.

Peter C Terry

Peter C Terry

Listening to music synchronized with exercise elevates mood, increases endurance, reduces perceived effort and increases metabolic efficiency, according to University of South Queensland’s Peter C. Terry, who collaborated with Karageorghis to produce a comprehensive review of psychophysical effects of music in sport and exercise.

Karageorghis collaborated with Brunel colleagues Denis A. Mouzourides, Tariq A. Sasso, Daley J. Morrish, and Carolyn L. Walley with David-Lee Priest of University of East Anglia,  to conclude that “
motivational qualities of music have considerable bearing on how long participants might endure a repetitive activity and their feelings during the task.”

David-Lee Priest

David-Lee Priest

They pointed to the public health and social implications of their findings when they asserted that “motivational synchronous music may serve as an important tool to underpin current initiatives of Western governments to improve public health and lessen the financial burdens on public health services.”

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-*How do you use music to enable task persistence?

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